Balázs Zsuzsanna – Splitting the Self

Over the last few months, I’ve been trying to find evidence to prove that Yeats’s idea of the self and its anti-self (the mask or Daimon) bears strong relation to Pirandello’s interpretation of the distinction between the so called persona and personaggio, and this analogy is most evident in their dramas. When Yeats writes to Olivia Shakespear…

Kassai Zita – Under disguise

It seems that pseudo castration as a form of disguise is a recurring motif in William Wycherley’s The Country Wife – or, at least, there are two remarkably similar cases in the play. In my last blog post, where I briefly reflected on how Margery Pinchwife’s cross-dressing can be regarded as an instance of “female…

Kassai Zita – Female Castration?

What can it possibly mean within the context of a seventeenth-century English drama? This was my very first reaction when I came across the phrase “female castration” while looking through some material on William Wycherley’s The Country Wife. Although in my first post I promised to focus on the notion of writing and deception, the…

Labundy Kati: Don’t Look at Me…

Sensing the look of either a stranger or of a friend at us may trigger questions and suspicion within ourselves concerning our own subject, while it may also raise fear of exposure and “possessedness”. Gazing admiringly at someone out of affection may seem acceptable as far as social and interpersonal behavioural norms are concerned. One…

Kassai Zita – Wife vs. Husband

  “Our wives, like their writings, [are] never safe but in our closets under lock and key,” claims Pinchwife, my favourite source of quotes when it comes to William Wycherley’s Restoration comedy, The Country Wife. The association of women and writing, which is a recurring motif in this comedy, casts light upon a serious contemporary…